B.R.S.M. Pain is temporary, publications are eternal

3Jan/154

Maoecrystal V (Part 1: Thomson)

Enantioselective Total Synthesis of (−)-Maoecrystal V

Regan J. Thompson et al., J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2014, 136, 17750 [PDF] [SI] [GROUP]

DOI: 10.1021/ja5109694

0 minus 1Maoecrystal V—as the advanced nature of its final letter implies—is one of a great many unusual terpinoids from the Chinese flowing plant Isodon eriocalyx.[1] It possesses a rather intricate and complex structure, a fact illustrated by the two decades that passed between its (first) isolation in 1994 and the successful determination of its structure in 2004—a long period indeed with modern spectroscopic techniques. Its dense, cage-like structure proved a tough nut to crack and another 5 years passed before the deluge of synthetic publications for this target began in 2009. The first total synthesis, reported somewhat controversially by the Yang group the following year, has only seemingly intensified the attention that it has received.

0 - Structure

Maoecrystal V exhibits a heavily modified version of the more common ent-kaurene skeleton.

Interestingly, despite the hugely varied interests and specializations of the groups involved, all five of the successful total syntheses reported to date have constructed the molecule’s prominent bicyclo[2.2.2]octane ring system using the venerable Diels–Alder reaction (often in conjunction with the similarly tried-and-true tactic of oxidative dearomatization to establish the diene). That said, the number of Diels–Alder variants employed is impressive, and you could almost imagine giving a short lecture course on the reaction using nothing but examples from synthetic studies on maoecrystal V. I’ve tried to illustrate the variety below.

All 5 total syntheses to date have used a Diels–Alder reaction to form the molecule's fused bicyclo[2.2.2]octane ring system. The reaction has also featured prominently in approaches by Baran, Trauner, Nicolaou, Chen, Movin, Sorensen and others.[2]

All 5 total syntheses to date have used a Diels–Alder reaction to form the molecule's fused bicyclo[2.2.2]octane ring system. The reaction has also featured prominently in approaches by Baran, Trauner, Nicolaou, Chen, Movin, Sorensen and others.[2]

I’ve long wanted to write something about maocrystal V total synthesis, but I’ve always been too busy around the time that people have completed it to get a blog post out reasonably close to the event. Fortunately, two back-to-back syntheses from the Zakarian and Thomson groups were published in J. Am. Chem. Soc. earlier this month and I’ve now got plenty time to write about both of them, starting with that of the Thomson group in this post.

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30Dec/140

Jiadifenolide (Part 2: Dalby/Paterson)

In the four months I spent not writing this post, the Paterson–Dalby synthesis of jiadifenolide was covered over at Synthetic Nature, but as I’d already put a few hours into it I decided to use the Christmas holidays to dust it off and finish it up. Enjoy! —BRSM

 

Total Synthesis of Jiadifenolide

I. Paterson et al., Angew. Chem. Int. Ed. 2014, 53, 7286–7289 [PDF] [SI] [Group]

DOI: 10.1002/anie.201404224
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The second synthesis in this two part series on jiadifenolide comes from the lab of Ian Paterson at Cambridge University in the UK, although it seems that Steven Dalby (now at Merck, Rahway) had enough of an impact on the work to also be named as a corresponding author. Like Sorensen’s approach, the British team also chose an “A-ring first” approach to the target, but instead of dipping into the chiral pool they instead built it up from simple 3-methyl-2-cyclopentenone through some clever use of a couple of highly diastereoselective rearrangements.

0a

No fancy starting materials here!

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12Jun/133

(-)-Neothiobinupharidine

I've not written all that many total synthesis posts this year, not for a dearth of interesting work, but more a lack of free time. I started writing this one about six months ago (!), and I guess most of you have probably seen this paper already, but I think it’s pretty cool so I decided it’d be worth finishing. Now featuring my new favourite piece of punctuation, the em dash!

Synthesis of (−)-Neothiobinupharidine

Ryan A. Shenvi et al., J. Am. Chem. Soc., 2013, 135, 1209 [PDF][SI][GROUP]

DOI: 10.1021/ja310778t

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The first of the rather wacky looking nuphar alkaloids were actually isolated back in the 60s by Achmatowicz (of Achmatowicz reaction 'fame'), the family has now grown to a fair size, as you can see from the borrowed figure below. No-one paid them much attention for a while, as they weren't very bioactive, looked quite intimidating, and everyone was probably too busy psyching themselves up to make vernolepin anyway.[1] However, a recent report that they selectively kill off melanoma cells (via a mechanism that no-one’s worked out yet), combined with a pretty cool biosynthetic proposal by LaLonde, was enough for Shenvi to spend a little time working out a synthesis.

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24Dec/128

Synthetic Biology versus Total Synthesis

From a series of paintings by David Cordes at Pacific University, Oregon.

I think most would agree that synthetic chemists can now make just about any non-protein/non-polysaccharide natural product if enough time, resources and manpower are brought to bear.[1] But that's not to say that the field is yet mature, or stagnating, as there still remain so many challenges to make our science more efficient, practical, and free from its current over-dependence on rare metals and petrochemical feedstocks. Recently, synthetic biology has started to emerge as a serious alternative to total synthesis when large amounts of complex natural products are required. Just think how many total synthesis papers start with a desultory line about 'the dearth of natural material', before recounting an arduous one- or two-yearlong quest to make a few more milligrams of the compound in question. Perhaps it sometimes makes more sense to try a different approach and ask 'can't we just improve the natural source?'. We synthetic chemists like to think we're special because we have the ability to make new compounds never seen in Nature, but with an increasing understanding of enzymes and the genes that encode for them, organisms can now be coaxed into producing compounds that have never been seen before. If you're interested in reading further debate over the future of the two fields then you should definitely read this short piece in Nature, in which champions of synthetic chemistry Phil Baran and Abraham Mendoza duke it out with Jay D. Keasling, a strong proponent of synthetic biology.

Reaction Vessels

From Nature, 492, 188.

Etc.

1.  Of course, there still exists the question of 'should we?'. Aside from the importance of total synthesis in structural determination, and ignoring for the moment the oft quoted reason of solving supply problems, the other main justification offered by the practitioners of the art is the development of new methodology. I'd love to find a way to test this claim, but my feeling is that few generally useful reactions are discovered in long synthetic campaigns. Let me know in the comments if I'm wrong about this.

Filed under: Current Literature, Total Synthesis | 10,963 views | 8 comments 8 Comments
18Nov/125

Mulvember 2: Echinopines A and B

Although there have been a couple of interesting syntheses this week, I'm still very busy so I'm going to write about another Mulzer synthesis from my talk. See my previous post for the background to this tribute.

 

Since their fairly recent isolation in 2008 the echinopine sesquiterpenes have proved quite popular targets for total synthesis. In fact, four rather different total syntheses have been reported since their unusual and compact molecular architectures first graced the literature. The first of these was that of Johann Mulzer, published just a year after their isolation, in which both natural products were synthesised in near enantiopure form (starting from cyclooctadiene!) and their absolute configurations were confirmed for the first time.[1]

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12Feb/1210

What’s Wrong With This Picture 1: Gibberellic Acid?

For people who say that inflation of yields is a new thing... think again. Corey's synthesis of gibberellic acid is otherwise really quite good.

Filed under: Literature, Total Synthesis, WWWTP | 9,376 views | 10 comments 10 Comments
20Nov/1110

Taxol Time Again: What now, Phil?

Update 20-11-2011: Reference added and a couple of mistakes removed. Why can I never see those the first time?

Scalable Enantioselective Total Synthesis of Taxanes

Baran et al., Nature Chemistry, 2011, [PDF][SI][GROUP]

 

The taxanes are a large family of 350 or so natural products, of which the best known is taxol itself, a multibillion dollar anticancer drug with a rich and storied history, whose name and distinctive tetracyclic system are instantly recognisable to most organic chemists. Taxol itself has already been the subject of 7 epic total syntheses (see BRSM Reviews: Taxol In 10 Minutes if you need a quick reminder), all using conventional functional group lead approaches to bond formation. Nature's (and Phil's) approach is a bit different, though, as we'll see.

Filed under: Current Literature, Total Synthesis | 13,468 views | 10 comments Continue reading