B.R.S.M. All this happened, more or less.

29Dec/138

Total Synthesis of (-)-Calyciphylline N

Long time no post! Other writing commitments—and the death of my laptop, containing two half-written posts—have conspired to keep me from getting any blogging done for the past couple of months, not to mention that being a postdoc in the US is somewhat more intense than it was in the UK. I’ll try and get back on some kind of semi-regular posting schedule again, even if it's just once or twice a month for the time being. Thanks for your patience! —BRSM

 

Total Synthesis of (−)-Calyciphylline N

A. B. Smith, III et al., J. Am. Chem. Soc., 2013, ASAP [PDF][SI][GROUP]

DOI: 10.1021/ja411539w

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If you’ve read more than a couple of posts on this site, you’ll have probably noticed by now that I’ve got quite a soft spot for chemical history and syntheses of so-called 'classic' targets. Aside from the fun of comparing how the techniques for actually making molecules have evolved—and marvelling at some of the dangerous reactions people used to do—it’s great to examine targets that have been made a number of times and compare the routes that different chemists chose. If I had a bit more time, I’d write a lot more blog posts in this vein. Or a book.[1]

In fact, so similar is the structure of calyciphylline N—whose total synthesis was published by Amos Smith last week—to that of daphmanidin E, which Eric Carreira conquered back in 2011, that I immediately found myself wanting to look through my old blog post and compare the two approaches. I'm not going to write this blog post up as a head-to-head comparison of the two, mostly because they're both heroic endeavours in their own rights, and hence such a post would be quite unwieldy—and certainly not casual holiday reading—but I'd encourage you to take a look for yourself.

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