B.R.S.M. Yield isn't everything

30Aug/132

And Now For Something Completely Different 9: Typographical Mistakes Of Yesteryear

Thanks to a co-worker, I recently became aware of a rather unique aside published within Thomas Tidewell's somewhat dated Tetrahedron Report on the Addition Reactions of Ketenes (Tetrahedron, 1986, 42, 2587–1613). Found spread over pages 2587–2588 is the following:

Aminals

It turns out that this note originates from a satirical piece in Chemistry in Britain (Chem. Br., 1965, 1, 230) published some 20 years previously. As far as I can tell, the root cause was an unfortunate typo in a Chemical Abstracts entry (Chem. Abst., 1965, 62,1561d) report from Paris on the discovery of a new chemical species—namely "O-Silylated Vinyl Ketene Animals"—by K. Vijayakumaran. If only such errors were uncommon enough (and chemists good natured enough) for this kind of banter in the literature of today! Have a good weekend!

Filed under: ANFSCD, Fun, Literature | 24,693 views | 2 comments 2 Comments
28Aug/135

Include Me Out: Mercury Azides

An interesting paper appeared in Angewandte Chemie yesterday detailing a re-investigation of a number of mercury azides that were—for reasons that will become apparent—not properly characterized when they were first reported in the literature back in the 1890s.[1] This publication is remarkable in a number of ways, not least that it has made today’s report on (trinitromethyl)borate synthesis seem rather boring and jejune in comparison.

mcontent

"Always  look on the bright azide of life" —Image and pun from Angewandte Chemie, 2013, Early View

It turns out that Hg2(N3)2 and α-Hg(N3)2 are both easily prepared using reported methods and are display predictable instability/toxicity, but nothing to write home about. The most exciting part of this paper focuses on the alternative β- form of Hg(N3)2. The authors describe the procedure as follows:

“In analogy to the preparation of β-Pb(N3)2, a second metastable modification of mercury(II) azide, β-Hg(N3)2 can be obtained by slow diffusion of aqueous NaN3 into a solution of mercury(II) nitrate which is separated by a layer of aqueous NaNO3. Thereby, needle-like crystals of β-Hg(N3)2 start to form in the lower mercury(II) nitrate layer which is always accompanied by spontaneous explosions during crystal growth finally leading to a mixing of the layers and the fast precipitation of α-Hg(N3)… Slow crystallization during the preparation of α- or β-Hg(N3)2 leads to the formation of large crystals which are extraordinarily sensitive to all kinds of provocation (e.g. even detonate in solution) and therefore should be avoided by all means. Nevertheless, with extreme care, we were able to manually isolate some specimens of β-Hg(N3)2 under the microscope which allowed the characterization by vibrational spectroscopy, single-crystal X-ray diffraction, and the determination of the melting point.

Now, when people talk about metastability I think of things like diamond and Dewar benzene; substances that actually have an appreciable energy barrier to their decay. You know, the sort of thing where you can say “hey, check this out! It’s metastable!” without your statement being punctuated by detonations and the sound of breaking glass followed by screams. Seriously, how are you supposed to prepare a compound that detonates at random under its own weight during crystallisation?

That said, if you look at the detailed procedure for the synthesis of β- Hg(N3)2 in the paper’s supporting information and skip the line that cautions “during this period explosions frequently occur” (just keep calm and carry on), then once you’ve made and isolated the compound it does sound surprisingly stable. In fact, once dry and pure—and after some rather fraught measurements by one of the students—the group was able to determine that the compound was stable up to 180 ºC when it sublimed. One day, I would like to meet the kind of person that works on projects like this!

 

  1. Of course, charactization during  that period largely revolved around melting point, taste and combustion analysis, all of which are hugely inappropriate for explosive mercury compounds (although I don’t doubt that people tried; the Merck index includes information on the taste of pyridine, presumably obtained shortly after its isolation a few decades previously).
  2. Also, does this figure from the paper seem a bit strange to you?

Mercury azide owl

Alternative caption: Figure 2. Top: ORTEP drawing of Hg2(N3)2.

Thermal ellipsoids set at 50% probability at 173 K. Selected

structural data are summarized in Table 1. Symmetry code (i) x+2, y, z+1.

Bottom:  Owl in flight, seen during acid trip.

Filed under: ANFSCD, Current Literature, Fun | 20,194 views | 5 comments 5 Comments
23Aug/134

(+/-)-Harringtonolide

Stereoselective Total Synthesis of Hainanolidol and Harringtonolide via Oxidopyrylium-Based [5 + 2] Cycloaddition

Weiping Tang et al., J. Am. Chem. Soc., 2013, ASAP; [PDF] [SI] [GROUP]

DOI: 10.1021/ja406255j

0

Everyone who's studies organic chemistry long enough has a favorite reaction or two, although unusually in my case I’ve never actually performed either of mine. One is the alkene–arene metaphotocycloaddition that I wrote about last year for Carmen’s IYC2011 Favourite Reaction Carnival, first discovered by Bryce-Smith (in Reading, UK, of all places) and sharpened into a useful synthetic tool by Wender, Mulzer and others. The second is probably the [5 + 2] oxidopyrylium cycloaddition, a handy way of making 7-membered rings with nary a metal in sight.[1] Neither is particularly common in total synthesis, so imagine my delight when I saw the latter featured in Tang’s recent synthesis of harringtonolide a couple of weeks back.

The target in question comes from the Cephalotaxus genus of plants, which—by means of the incredibly popular cephalotaxine and harringtonine alkaloids—has provided synthetic chemists with a great deal of entertainment over the past 50 years or so. It’s interesting to note that the Cephalotaxus genus itself belongs to the larger family Taxaceae, which also encompasses the yew tree Taxus baccata, well known to natural products chemists as the original source of the famous microtubule stabiliser and anti-cancer drug taxol. Well, it seems that humankind has again struck gold in the Taxaeae family as harringtonolide has recently been demonstrated to be a remarkable potent and selective anti-neoplastic agent. But enough on taxol and taxonomy—let’s talk synthesis!

The group’s plan relied on the use of the aforementioned [5 + 2] oxidopyrylium cycloaddition to construct the seven membered ring. This clever, central disconnection essentially reduces the rather intimidating carbon skeleton of harringtonolide to a comparatively simple problem in decalin synthesis and—although it's a rather strange looking species—the precursor to the oxidopyrylium required to pull it off is just a simple furan.

1

Filed under: Current Literature, Total Synthesis | 38,292 views | 4 comments Continue reading